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Citing Sources

CSE (formerly CBE) Style is a citation style commonly used in the Life Sciences.

CSE has two types of formats: Name/Year and Citation Sequence.

 

 

Formatting your CSE Paper

Ask your instructor which CSE citation format he/she prefers.

Create a title page with the paper title near top, your name at the center, and your class, instructor, and date at bottom. Center align all title page text.

For the following pages, insert a running header including paper title and page number, and align right.

(Citation sequence only) Prepare a footnote each time you cite something in the text. To do this in Word, enter the endnote number in the text (i.e. 1). Highlight the number, open your Font menu, and select Superscript.

  Prepare a Cited References pages (if using Citation Sequence, list your sources in the order in which you cite them.)

Style Guide from the Library

In-text Citation (Name/Year)

Author last name and Year go in parenthesis after citation.

Example:

Although women can compete with men in the workplace and receive higher education, they are subjugated to a societal pressure from advertisements and the media that bases their self-worth on their appearance. This results in an unhealthy infatuation with women's appearance that hinders their ability to succeed (Wolf 1991).

In-text Citation (Citation Sequence)

The citation sequence format uses footnotes. However, the footnotes do not appear with in the text of your paper, but in your bibliography. Your references will be listed in the order in which they appear in your paper, rather than alphabetical. If you refer to a previously cited source in your paper, the number you use for the foot note must be the same as the previously cited source.

Example:

 Although women can compete with men on many levels, they are subjugated to a societal pressure from advertisements and the media that bases their self-worth on their appearance1. For example, women comprise over 85% of those suffering eating disorders2. Wolf argues that this is largely due to our society's "cult-like" obession with thinness1.

Bibliography

1. Wolf N. The beauty myth: How images of beauty are used against women. New York (NY): Doubleday; 1991

2. National Institute of Mental Health, compiler. What are eating disorders [Internet]? Washington, DC: NIMH; 2000 [cited 2009 Nov 3]. Available  from: http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/eating-disorders/index.shtml.

How do I cite...?

Book, 1 Author

Wolf N. The beauty myth: How images of beauty are used against women. New York (NY): Doubleday; 1991

Book, 2 Authors

Beecher W, Beecher M.  Beyond success and failure. Marina Del Ray (CA): Julian Press; 1966.

Article in a Book/Encyclopedia

Hubbard, K, O'Neill A, Cheakalos C. Out of control. In: Bradbury T, Yee-Bradbury C. Abnormal psychology: Essential cases and readings. New York: W.W.  Norton & Company; 2002. p. 266-269

Journal Article, 3 authors

Green C, Knysz W, Tsuang MT. A homeless person with bipolar disorder and a history of Serious Self-Mutilation.  Am J of Psych. 2000; 57(1):1392-1397.

Article Accessed From Electronic Database (more than 3 authors)

Coulton A, Keith AE, Zuckerman S, Daly R, Jordan J. Eleni's creepy cookies.  People Mag [Internet]. 2009 [cited 2009 Nov 10]; 72(17):100,   Academic Search Complete. Ipswich (MA): EBSCO Publishing.

Webpage

The Chronicle of Higher Education. Are too many students going to college [Internet]?  Washington (DC): Chronicle of Higher Education; 2009 Nov 8 [cited 2009 Nov 10]. Available from: http://chronicle.com/article/Are-Too-Many-Students-Going-to/49039/.